Mushroom Freezer Breakfast Burritos

Don’t let hectic mornings stop you from fueling properly. Whip up a batch of these Mushroom Freezer Breakfast Burritos, so you can have a healthy and energizing breakfast at your fingertips in minutes. 

This blog post is sponsored by The Mushroom Council. All opinions are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that make this blog possible. 

Mornings are like a catch 22 in my house. I love a good morning routine that includes stretching, exercising and eating a healthy breakfast to start my day off on a positive and energizing note. (And sometimes I’m lucky enough to get this idyllic morning.) But there are those type of mornings when I roll out of bed, start going through my to-do list in my head and barely have time for a slice of toast before heading out the door for my morning run.

To avoid the latter situation, I’ve put systems in place to take some time for relaxation and fueling in the morning. For example, I’ve implemented a hard “no computer before 9 am” rule, and I make a healthy breakfast ahead of time. That may sound like a lot of work, but I promise you it’s easy with these make-ahead Mushroom Freezer Breakfast Burritos. I prepare a big batch at the beginning of the week, freeze them and microwave in the morning for a hearty breakfast that is jam packed with nutrients. 

Why I love mushrooms

Certain ingredients give you so much bang for your buck that you should always have them in your fridge. Mushrooms definitely fall into this category, and I’m excited to celebrate Mushroom Month by sharing all the reasons I love ‘shrooms. 

Before delving into the nutritional benefits of mushrooms, let’s talk about their flavor. Mushrooms have a savory umami flavor that really amps up the taste of any dish. As a matter of fact, many chefs are now blending mushrooms into burgers, meatloaf and meatballs to cut back on meat and boost plant consumption.  A study from The Culinary Institute of America (CIA) and University of California-Davis found preparing a traditional ground meat recipe with a mushroom-meat blend can actually double the umami impact and enhance the overall flavor. 

Not to mention that mushrooms pack a lot of nutrition into a little package. Here are just some of their nutritional highlights: 

  • Mushrooms have Vitamin D. This important nutrient comes mainly from the sun, and mushrooms are the only source of Vitamin D in the produce aisle. This important vitamin is necessary for the absorption of calcium and maintenance of strong bone.
  • Mushrooms are a source of B vitamins, which provide energy throughout the body by breaking down proteins, fats and carbohydrates.
  • Mushrooms contain selenium– an antioxidant that protects cells from damage that might lead to heart disease, some cancers and other diseases of aging.
  • Mushrooms have potassium, which is important for normal fluid and mineral balance and helps control blood pressure. Potassium also plays a role in nerve and muscle function.
  • They are also low in calories and have other important nutrients like riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid.

Why mushrooms make great fuel for exercise

I’ve talked a lot on this blog about choosing the right foods to fuel you through activity. But if you’re new here or need a refresher…

Active individuals, like runners, triathletes, weekend warriors or anyone who loves their fitness classes, need to eat plenty of nutrient-rich carbohydrates to provide fuel for activity. If you don’t fuel properly before a workout, you’ll likely feel fatigued and your workout will suffer. 

Recovery nutrition after a workout is just as important as what you eat beforehand. It’s best to eat a mix of carbs and protein within 1-hour after a workout to replenish stored carbs you used during the workout (called glycogen) and help with muscle recovery and growth. 

Lastly, certain micronutrients, like Vitamin D, are essential for athletes to keep their bodies healthy. As I mentioned earlier, Vitamin D is crucial for bone health, especially for athletes that put a lot of pressure on their bones, like runners.

What you may not realize is that mushrooms have all of these nutrients– carbs, protein and Vitamin D. That means they are perfect to eat before or after a workout. For example, a 3-ounce serving of crimini mushrooms (about 1 cup raw whole crimini mushrooms) has: 

  • 4 grams of carbohydrate (3.6)
  • 2 grams of protein
  • 3 IU of vitamin D

In other words, it’s time to switch up your fueling routine! If you’re tired of the standard nut butter on toast, why not top your toast with some mushrooms and hummus? Or recover from a workout with these make-ahead Mushroom Freezer Breakfast Burritos. 

These are a great option because they have a mixture of carbs from the mushrooms, protein from the eggs and mushrooms and antioxidants from the spinach and mushrooms. Not to mention that the combo of mushrooms, eggs and goat cheese is so creamy, savory and satisfying that your tastebuds will be happy after heating this up in the microwave. 

How to make Mushroom Freezer Breakfast Burritos

The key to preparing these freezer burritos is thinking ahead. I know that’s not always easy with your crazy schedule, but believe me when I say it’s worth it. Add some crimini mushrooms, eggs, spinach, whole wheat tortillas and goat cheese to your shopping list, and make a few of these on a weekend afternoon. Wrap them in foil, place in a freezer bag and freeze. 

Label the freezer bag with what’s inside and the date. You can leave them in the freezer for up to 3 months, so I highly recommend making a large batch. When you’re ready to eat them, take the burrito out of the foil, pop it in the microwave for 1-2 minutes and you’ve got a healthy recovery breakfast for after any type of workout. 

Mushroom Freezer Breakfast Burritos

A high protein vegetarian breakfast burrito that you can make and freeze for a healthy breakfast on a busy morning

Course Breakfast
Keyword breakfast burrito
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings 4 burritos
Calories 360 kcal

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons neutral oil canola, vegetable, grapeseed
  • ½ white onion diced
  • 2 garlic clove minced
  • 2 cups crimini mushrooms chopped
  • 4 cups loosely packed spinach chopped
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 8 large eggs
  • 3 tablespoons of milk
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Cooking spray
  • 4 large whole wheat tortillas
  • ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons goat cheese

Instructions

  1. Heat a large skillet over medium high heat and add oil to pan. Add the onion, garlic and cook for 2-3 minutes or until translucent.
  2. Add the mushrooms and cook until they are golden brown (about 3-4 minutes). Flip the mushrooms, so the other side can cook. Place the spinach in the pan and cook until it’s wilted or about 3-4 minutes. Season with salt and stir all the veggies together. Remove from heat and set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk together eggs and milk. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Heat another large skillet over medium heat. Spray the skillet with cooking spray and add egg mixture. Cook for 4-5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the eggs have set. Remove from heat.
  5. Heat the tortillas in the microwave for 10 seconds (they are easier to roll when warm). Lay out the tortillas on four separate pieces of aluminum foil and spread one and a half tablespoon of goat cheese on each tortilla. Evenly distribute the roasted vegetables and scrambled eggs among the four tortillas. Roll each one up in the foil and place in a freezer bag. Freeze.
  6. When ready to eat from the freezer, unwrap the burritos from the foil. Place on a microwave safe dish and microwave on high for 1-2 minutes or until heated throughout.

Recipe Notes

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Don’t let hectic mornings stop you from fueling properly. Whip up a batch of these Mushroom Freezer Breakfast Burritos, so you can have a healthy and energizing breakfast at your fingertips in minutes. #healthybreakfast #breakfastburrito #eggwrap #mushroomrecipe

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